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Voyager 1 by Melissa Walter and Travis Walter

An abstract view of Voyager 1's the Golden Record by artist Melissa Walter and her husband, Travis Walter. This piece debuted May 26th at Teros Gallery in San Diego, CA in the solo exhibition by Melissa titled "A New Stellar Order." Travis is playing the piece.

In 1977 NASA launched a probe into space called Voyager 1. Aboard the craft is a phonograph with recordings and images curated by Carl Sagan that are intended to be found by some kind of extraterrestrial life form, or even by future humans. On the record discoverers will hear greetings in many languages, ambient sounds on Earth from animals to traffic, and music of many different cultures and time periods. There are also diagrams pinpointing our location in our star system, diagrams of our DNA structure, photographs of all ages and races of people, images of various landscapes we find on our planet, and so much more.

Even though it has been traveling for over 38 years, Voyager 1 is still communicating with the Deep Space Network. In July 2014 it became the first and only man-made object to leave our solar system and maneuver into interstellar space.

Supernova_Melissa_Walter.jpg
Galaxy Merger
Galaxy Merger

When two (or more) galaxies collide the stars and dark matter of each galaxy are the first affected. As the merger evolves the orbit of the stars become complex and random, completely abandoning their previous orbit. Within these mergers astronomers have seen extreme amounts of star formation.


Our very own Milky Way Galaxy is on a collision course with the Andromeda Galaxy. However, that merger is not predicted to occur for another billion years. Even then, since stars and star systems (like our own solar system) have vast distances between them, it is very unlikely that Earth and our Sun will collide with anything during the process. Therefore, our view of the stars in the night sky will change but, most likely, nothing else.


Ink on Paper
18" x 24"
2015

GraviationalWaves_Melissa_Walter_B.jpg
Nebula_Melissa_Walter.jpg
Pulsar_Melissa_Walter.jpg
NeutronStar_Melissa_Walter.jpg
SolarWind_Melissa_Walter.jpg
Mel_Art-9.jpg
Mel_Art-8.jpg
Mel_Art-6.jpg
Mel_Art-7.jpg
Voyager 1 by Melissa Walter and Travis Walter
Supernova_Melissa_Walter.jpg
Galaxy Merger
GraviationalWaves_Melissa_Walter_B.jpg
Nebula_Melissa_Walter.jpg
Pulsar_Melissa_Walter.jpg
NeutronStar_Melissa_Walter.jpg
SolarWind_Melissa_Walter.jpg
Voyager 1 by Melissa Walter and Travis Walter

An abstract view of Voyager 1's the Golden Record by artist Melissa Walter and her husband, Travis Walter. This piece debuted May 26th at Teros Gallery in San Diego, CA in the solo exhibition by Melissa titled "A New Stellar Order." Travis is playing the piece.

In 1977 NASA launched a probe into space called Voyager 1. Aboard the craft is a phonograph with recordings and images curated by Carl Sagan that are intended to be found by some kind of extraterrestrial life form, or even by future humans. On the record discoverers will hear greetings in many languages, ambient sounds on Earth from animals to traffic, and music of many different cultures and time periods. There are also diagrams pinpointing our location in our star system, diagrams of our DNA structure, photographs of all ages and races of people, images of various landscapes we find on our planet, and so much more.

Even though it has been traveling for over 38 years, Voyager 1 is still communicating with the Deep Space Network. In July 2014 it became the first and only man-made object to leave our solar system and maneuver into interstellar space.

Galaxy Merger

When two (or more) galaxies collide the stars and dark matter of each galaxy are the first affected. As the merger evolves the orbit of the stars become complex and random, completely abandoning their previous orbit. Within these mergers astronomers have seen extreme amounts of star formation.


Our very own Milky Way Galaxy is on a collision course with the Andromeda Galaxy. However, that merger is not predicted to occur for another billion years. Even then, since stars and star systems (like our own solar system) have vast distances between them, it is very unlikely that Earth and our Sun will collide with anything during the process. Therefore, our view of the stars in the night sky will change but, most likely, nothing else.


Ink on Paper
18" x 24"
2015

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